Expanding our understanding of the global contributions of SSFs

Motivation:

In 2012, the World Bank, FAO and WorldFish Center published Hidden Harvest: The Global Contribution of Capture Fisheries (‘HH1’), a study that included estimates of the scope and economic importance of small-scale fisheries. However, given the increased international attention to SSFs, the HH1 study would benefit from a refinement and update that expands measures of the role that SSFs play in sustainable development more broadly.  

Research Questions:

  • What are the contributions of small-scale fisheries to the three dimensions of sustainable development – social, economic and environmental – as well as governance, at the global level?
  • What are the key drivers of change, including both threats and opportunities, describing the contributions of small-scale fisheries to sustainable development?

Goals and Deliverables:

For this reason, we propose to update the HH1 study, to include additional measures of the contribution of small-scale fisheries to sustainable development as well as governance, and particularly noting contributions of SSF toward achieving internationally-agreed goals. In addition, the update will identify the main drivers of change or transformation. To achieve these aims, the study results and final publication will include:

  1. Quantification of selected key indicators/variables at the global level, including indicators that can be used to monitor different governance and management arrangements in selected countries.
  2. Thematic studies on central issues that provide a narrative supporting the global trends and analyze the drivers of change/transformation.

Methodology:

The HH2 study will be conducted primarily using three main approaches: 1) Leveraging global datasets by correcting for small-scale fisheries underreporting and applying ratio estimates to disaggregate small-scale and large-scale fisheries contributions. 2) Undertaking national-level case studies that can form the basis for extrapolation to the global level. 3) Assembling non-scalable data that highlight the contributions of and drivers of change in small-scale fisheries in specific contexts.

Partners:

The three organizations – FAO, World Fish and Duke University – constitute the core study team but there are many other potential collaborators. Funding support is generously provided by the Oak Foundation.

 

Products:

Timeline:

The aim is to publish and launch the HH2 publication in 2020, publishing peer-reviewed articles along the way. Project start: January 1, 2018. Project end: June 30, 2020.