Technology – Research at the Nicholas School
  
RESEARCH @ NICHOLAS | from discoveries to solutions
OUR FOCUS AREAS
OUR LABS & CENTERS
OUR FOCUS AREAS: OCEANS
OUR FOCUS AREAS: TECHNOLOGY
OUR FOCUS AREAS: ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
OUR FOCUS AREAS: ENERGY
OUR FOCUS AREAS: WATER
OUR FOCUS AREAS: ECOLOGY & CONSERVATION
OUR FOCUS AREAS: SUSTAINABILITY
OUR FOCUS AREAS: CLIMATE CHANGE
OUR FOCUS AREAS: ECONOMICS, POLICY & GOVERNANCE
OUR FOCUS AREAS: TOXICOLOGY
OUR FOCUS AREAS: WETLANDS
OUR FOCUS AREAS: FORESTS
OUR FOCUS AREAS: GEOSCIENCES
OUR FOCUS AREAS: ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE
OUR FOCUS AREAS: FOOD SYSTEMS
OUR FOCUS AREAS: URBAN ENVIRONMENT

Category Archives: Technology

Project: Marine Use of GIS

Keith VanGraafeiland & Sean Breyer/Esri

Nicholas Researcher

Patrick Halpin is an Associate Professor of Marine Geospatial Ecology in the Marine Science and Conservation Division of the Nicholas School of the Environment, Duke University. Prof. Halpin leads the Marine Geospatial Ecology Lab with laboratory facilities located at the main campus of Duke University as well as the Duke University Marine Lab. He received his Ph.D. in Environmental Sciences from the University of Virginia in 1995. Prof. Halpin’s research focuses on marine geospatial analysis, ecological applications of geographic information systems and remote sensing; marine conservation and ecosystem-based management. Prof. Halpin sits on a number of international scientific and conservation program steering committees including the Ocean Biogeographic Information System (OBIS), the Global Oceans Biodiversity Initiative (GOBI), the Marine Working Group for the Group on Earth Observations – Biodiversity Observing Networks (GEO-BON) and the Google Oceans Advisory Council.

Learn more about Pat’s work with the Marine Geospatial Ecology Lab >.

Project: Drones in Marine Conservation

Drones can be as effective as traditional methods for conducting wildlife population assessments.


Nicholas Researchers

Dr. David W. Johnston is an Associate Professor of the Practice of Marine Conservation & Ecology at Duke University and Director of the Duke Marine Robotics and Remote Sensing Lab. Johnston holds a PhD from Duke University and received post-doctoral training at the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute in California. His professional experience ranges from leading research programs for NOAA to working as an ecologist within the NGO sector. Johnston’s research program focuses on the ecology and habitat needs of marine vertebrates in relation to pressing conservation issues such as climate change, habitat loss, ocean noise, incidental mortality and overharvests. He has published extensively in top journals in the fields of conservation biology, oceanography, marine ecology and marine policy on research that spans tropical, temperate and polar biomes. Johnston is an innovative teacher with experience in both large and small classrooms, and is skilled in Massive Open Online Courses, field-based learning situations, data visualization and digital textbook development and publication.

Dr. Andy Read‘s research interests are in the conservation biology of long-lived marine vertebrates, particularly marine mammals, seabirds and sea turtles. Much of his current research documents the effects of human activities on populations of these species and attempts to find solutions to such conflicts. This work involves field work, experimentation and modeling. He is particularly interested in the development and application of new conservation tools.