Duke study on shale gas and fracking

Since 2010, research at Duke University (Vengosh and Jackson labs at the Nicholas School of Environment, Plata lab at the Pratt Engineering School) has engaged in studying different aspects of  environmental effects of shale gas exploration and hydraulic fracturing. We have published the first peer-reviewed studies examining  drinking water quality and shale gas extraction (see list below).  Our current (May 2013) database includes data generated from over 400 wells in northeastern Pennsylvania and southern New York, 130 wells in central Arkansas, 100 wells in North Carolina, and 50 wells in West Virginia. New sampling is now conducted in Texas. In addition, we have collected a total of 61 produced waters samples from shale gas and conventional gas wells in Pennsylvania and New York and conducted a detailed study on the impact of shale gas liquid waste disposal in waterways in Pennsylvania in order to evaluate the extent, composition, and environmental impacts of conventional and non-conventional  long-term wastewater disposal.

A shale gas well in Montrose, Pennsylvania – keep your speakers up!

 

List of Publications on shale gas and hydraulic fracturing (see links to papers):

Jackson, R.B., Vengosh, A., Darrah, T.H.,  Warner, N.R., Down, A., Poreda, R.J., Osborn, S.G., Zhao, K., and Karr, J.D. (2013) Increased stray gas abundance in a subset of drinking water wells near Marcellus shale gas extraction. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of United States of America (June, 2013). PNAS_Jacksonetal2013

Vengosh, A., Warner N.R., Jackson, R.B., Darrah, T.H., (2013). The Effects of Shale Gas Exploration and Hydraulic Fracturing on the Quality of Water Resources in the United States. Procedia Earth and Planetary Science, 7, 863–866 (Overview on shale gas development).

Warner N.R., Kresse, T.M., Hays, P.D., Down, A., Karr, J.D., Jackson, R.B., Vengosh, A. (2013) Geochemical and isotopic variations in shallow groundwater in areas of Fayetteville Shale development, north central Arkansas. Applied Geochemistry (http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.apgeochem.2013.04.013).AG_shale gas_AK)

Warner, N.R., Jackson, R.B., Darrah, T.H., Osborn, S.G., Down, A., Zhao, K., White, A. Vengosh, A. (2012). Reply to Engelder: Potential for fluid migration from the Marcellus Formation remains possible. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of United States of America (December 10, 2012).

Warner, N.R., Jackson, R.B., Darrah, T.H., Osborn, S.G., Down, A., Zhao, K., White, A. Vengosh, A. (2012). Geochemical evidence for possible natural migration of Marcellus formation brine to shallow aquifers in Pennsylvania. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of United States of America. Published online before print July 9, 2012, doi: 10.1073/pnas.1121181109.

Adair, S., Pearson,  B.R., J Monast, J., Vengosh, A. Jackson, R.B. (2012). Considering shale gas extraction in North Carolina: lessons from other states. Duke Environmental Law and Policy Forum, XXII, 257-301.

Jackson R.B., Osborn S.G., Vengosh, A., Warner, N.R. (2011). Reply to Davis: Hydraulic fracturing remains a possible mechanism for observed methane contamination of Drinking water. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of United States of America, 108, E872.

Osborn, S., Vengosh, A. Warner, N. Jackson, R. (2011). Reply to Saba and Orzechowski and  Schon: Methane contamination of  drinking water accompanying gas-  well drilling and hydraulic fracturing. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of United States of America, 108, 8172–8176.

Osborn, S., Vengosh, A. Warner, N. Jackson, R. (2011). Methane contamination of drinking water accompanying gas drilling and hydro-fracking. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of United States of America, 108, 8172-8176.

 

 
Nicholas School of the Environment | Box 90328 | Duke University | Durham, NC 27708

how to contact us > | login to the site >